News

The Cancer CAG announces seed grants for four interdisciplinary projects

More News

13 February 2019
Image - The Cancer CAG announces seed grants for four interdisciplinary projects

The Cancer CAG has committed almost $200,000 in new seed grants for four projects led by early- and mid-career researchers to be undertaken in 2019. Congratulations to the four successful teams.

  1. STEP FORWARDS: Piloting of a stepped care model for fear of cancer recurrence. Led by Dr Ben Smith, Ingham Institute. The project involves the Ingham Institute, SESLHD, SWSLHD, UNSW, UTS as well as Black Dog Institute, University of Sydney
  2. GBM-IMMUNOMICS: GBM patient response map with spatial resolution of GBM tumour cells within its immune microenvironment partnering immunotherapy.  Led by Dr Sylvia Chung, UNSW.  The project includes the CCI, SESLHD, UNSW as well as Douglass Hanly Moir, University of Sydney
  3. Guideline-concordant breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy. Led by Dr Marina van Leeuwen, UNSW.  The project includes the SESLHD, SWSLHD, UNSW as well as Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University of Adelaide
  4. Unravelling the regulatory mechanisms behind checkpoint inhibition in the presence of corticosteroid. Led by Dr Toni Jue, UNSW.  The project includes the CCI, SESLHD, UNSW as well as the University of Sydney.

The E/MCR seed grants fund academics and clinical-academics up to 10 years post-PhD to lead new collaborative research with mentoring and support provided through a structured team. They aim to develop our research workforce and emerging leaders.

The successful projects are substantive, cross-disciplinary initiatives with evidence of a clear pathway to significant external peer reviewed funding of any category to sustain and build ongoing research.  The funds for these collaborative grants are sourced from Cancer CAG and SPHERE funds (where available) and administered by UNSW Sydney.

The Cancer CAG looks forward to sharing progress about this research.  Read more about UNSW Medicine’s Cancer theme and the opportunities for collaborative research.

Research Tags: