Events

The health of whole blood donors: can we overcome the healthy donor effect?

Event date: 
19 February 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Room 305, Level 3, Samuels Building, UNSW Upper Campus, Kensington
Open to: 
Open to all
Cost: 
Free - no booking required
Event Type: 
Seminar
School/Unit: 
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, SPHCM
Booking deadline: 

Blood donation is vital for a high quality healthcare system. Research looking at the long-term health effects of blood donation has been limited, and has generated large, but implausible, beneficial effects of whole blood donation. In this talk Professor Andrew Hayen will discuss the nature of the healthy donor effect, and possible methods to overcome it. He will present empirical analyses using data from the Australian Red Cross Lifeblood’s EDV:Link project. The project uses linked datasets from the National Blood Management System, a census of all blood donors in Australia, which has been linked to the 45 and Up Study and other administrative datasets. He will discuss the use of the target trial method, and the importance of using negative controls in epidemiological research.

About Professor Andrew Hayen

Andrew is Professor of Biostatistics at the School of Public Health at the University of Technology Sydney, a Visiting Professor at Australian Red Cross Lifeblood, and a Conjoint Professor at UNSW.  Andrew is Director of Studies for public health at UTS, where he oversees public health teaching in the Faculty of Health. Andrew’s research focusses on the development and application of statistical methods in public health and clinical medicine.  Andrew is a former president of the Australasian Epidemiological Association.  This work formed part of Andrew’s recent sabbatical at the Australian Red Cross Lifeblood.

Contact for inquiries: 
Ravit Danieli-Vlandis ravit@unsw.edu.au
Andrew Hayen SPHCM Seminar

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29 February 2020

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