Local applicants

UNSW Medicine continues to be an exceptionally popular program and we usually receive in excess of 3500 applicants for the 135 local spots. You are most likely to be offered a spot in the UNSW Medicine program if you achieve the highest possible result in each of the tree criteria (academic merit, UMAT, interview).

Please note that the minimum scores are unlikely to be sufficient to be selected. This is illustrated by the fact that although the minimum ATAR for eligibility is 96.00, the median ATAR required for entry is always greater than 99.60. Similarly for both UMAT and the interview, the median scores required for entry are close to the top of the respective ranges.

Achieving the minimum academic merit and UMAT result does not guarantee selection for interview. You can find details on how we select students for an interview on our Selection Criteria.

In October, UNSW Medicine will contact schools for each applicant’s predicted ATAR, so students do not need to send this information to us directly. In December, we will receive ATAR information directly from UAC, so again, there is no need that students provide their results to us themselves.

Although there are no prerequisites for entry into UNSW Medicine, we recommend that students study English for their final high school examinations. There is assumed knowledge of this subject and studying it is considered desirable for successful study in the Medicine Program. Students who do not have the assumed level of knowledge are eligible to apply, be offered a place and to enrol, but may be placed at a considerable disadvantage.

In addition, study in Chemistry is recommended.

We do not offer a graduate pathway, i.e. it is not possible to join our program only for the MD component.

There is a graduate entry stream into the Medicine program, but only for students enrolled in the UNSW Bachelor of Medical Science (BMedSc). More details can be found on our Special Admission Schemes.

There are no full-fee places available for local (non-international) applicants.

No, we do not have a separate quota for non-school leavers.

To find out if you are eligible to apply for medicine or to have your qualification assessed, please contact UAC and request Qualification Assessment Service (QAS) which is available for a fee. This service is available all year round and beneficial to applicants who have completed any University study. The Faculty is unable to do individual qualification pre-assessment outside of the formal application process.

As a guide, if a local applicant has an ATAR of less than 93.00, their tertiary results can never be sufficient to raise their academic results to the equivalent of the minimum ATAR of 96.00 required for consideration for entry. An applicant who scores a ATAR of around 98 would need to achieve results of high distinctions in some courses and distinctions in the rest in order to maintain the equivalent ATAR.

Applicants who have not completed the NSW HSC (or equivalent) are required to complete a minimum of one year full-time of recognised university studies. The GPA will then be converted into an ATAR equivalent.

UMAT is only valid for a year. This means that applicants need to sit UMAT in the year they apply for Medicine at UNSW.

For information on undergraduate coursework scholarships, please visit the UNSW Scholarships website and enquiry with the scholarships team directly if you have any questions.

Applicants may be aware that there are courses that claim to improve performance in UMAT or in the interview. The Faculty would like applicants to be aware that:

  • As stated in the UMAT Information Booklet, ACER and the UMAT Consortium universities do not recommend or endorse any commercially available courses offering UMAT preparation. Neither ACER nor any of the Consortium universities conduct UMAT preparation courses.
  • Some claims by those who provide these courses as to the high number who attended their courses and subsequently gained entry into UNSW Medicine have been found either to be untrue or profoundly exaggerated.
  • Some providers also give misleading information concerning the application process for UNSW Medicine. One false claim is that the UNSW Medicine Application Form is used as part of the selection of applicants for the interview. The Faculty makes it very clear that students are selected for the interview solely on their UMAT result and their academic record or predicted HSC result. Applicants therefore do not increase at all their chances for an interview by paying someone to review their UNSW Medicine Application Form.
  • The interview at UNSW is significantly different from those used at other medical schools, with our interview focussing on your life experiences. There is no evidence that students who undertake interview training courses perform better at the interview. On the contrary, feedback from interviewers has indicated that students who have obviously been coached have been at a disadvantage in our style of interview.

This is an extremely difficult question to answer, and one which requires a great deal of individual assessment.

In all cases, students should carefully consider their determination to pursue a career in medicine and, in line with that, their willingness to spend one year repeating the HSC or one or more years undertaking a tertiary program in order to again attempt admission to UNSW Medicine.

An alternative to repeating the HSC is to enrol in another tertiary program. This is where the decision may become difficult. A quandary here is that students may undertake tertiary programs in which they have no particular vocational interest and, having completed one or more years, fail to achieve entry into the first year of UNSW Medicine.

The obvious problem then is that students are on a degree path in which they have little interest. As no guarantee can be given about the chances of success of students obtaining entry to UNSW Medicine, students should make careful choices of tertiary programs to ensure that if they do not succeed in obtaining a place in UNSW Medicine, they have enrolled in programs in which they do have interest and which can be used to pursue different careers other than the practice of medicine.

Another issue to be considered is that the academic component for selection for students who commence a university degree is based on both the ATAR and tertiary results, which are combined at a ratio of 50:50. Thus, if a local applicant has a ATAR of less than 93.00, their tertiary results can never be sufficient to raise their academic results to the equivalent of the minimum ATAR of 96.00 required for consideration for entry. On the other hand, an applicant who achieves an ATAR of around 98 would need to reach results of high distinctions in some courses and distinctions in the rest in order to maintain the equivalent ATAR.

Students should note that when electing to undertake tertiary studies in another program with the aim of obtaining a place in UNSW Medicine, they are not restricted to programs offered by the University of New South Wales and therefore may consider programs offered by any Australian university. Science and Arts based programs are equally acceptable.

Note that there is a separate admission process for students applying from the Bachelor of Medical Science program at UNSW. You can find more information on the Graduate Entry Stream for UNSW BMedSc Students on our Special Admission Schemes page.

You can find detailed information about the BMed/MD program in the online UNSW Handbook.

For information on housing, please visit the UNSW Housing website and contact the housing team directly if you have any questions.

Please note that residential college accommodation is limited and there are always waiting lists. Students interested in college accommodation are advised to apply early preferably three to six months before starting at UNSW.

Students may apply for admission to UNSW Medicine after completing some tertiary study. Please note that the Faculty does not set a limit to the number of years an applicant may submit an application for admission.

University study includes bachelor degrees, masters by coursework, masters by research and PhD.

Applicants who have completed at least 0.75 full-time study equivalent of their first year of a tertiary program will be assessed based on their secondary and tertiary results which are weighted equally.

For applicants who have completed more than one program of University study, UAC will assess each qualification separately and use the highest score to determine the tertiary academic rank. Tertiary academic rank will then be combined with the secondary academic rank at a ratio of 50:50 to determine the final academic rank used for medicine admission.

To find out if you are eligible to apply for medicine or to have your qualification assessed, please contact UAC and request a Qualification Assessment Service (QAS) which is available for a fee. This service is available all year round and beneficial to applicants who have completed any University study. The Faculty receive academic scores through UAC in December each year and is unable to do individual qualification pre-assessment outside of the formal application process.

As a guide, if a local applicant has a ATAR of less than 93.00, their tertiary results can never be sufficient to raise their academic results to the equivalent of the minimum ATAR of 96.00 required for consideration for entry. An applicant who achieves a ATAR of around 98 would need to reach results of high distinctions in some courses and distinctions in the rest in order to maintain the equivalent ATAR.

Please note that domestic students who are currently enrolled in a medical degree at another Australian university are not eligible to seek admission to UNSW Medicine as a commencing student. Please visit our Special Admission Schemes page for further details.

Due to the structure of the curriculum, few if any credits can be granted to students transferring after partly completing or completing another degree. Exemption from all or part of the requirement to undertake 12 Units of Credit of General Education courses will be considered and granted when applicable.

After completing one of the medicine programs, the new graduate usually works for at least one year as a Junior Medical Officer (JMO), also known as ‘intern’, in selected hospitals in order to obtain registration as a medical practitioner with a State Medical Board. Further study and experience is required before specialist qualifications can be obtained. For further information:

UNSW Medicine has one intake of students per year. Classes in the first three years commence in the last week of February or the first week in March and conclude in late November or early December. For details you can access the UNSW Medicine academic calendar.

The main hospitals located in Sydney which are used for clinical teaching are:

  • Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick
  • St George Hospital, Kogarah
  • St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst
  • Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool
  • Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick
  • Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick
  • Sutherland Hospital, Caringbah
  • Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown
  • Fairfield Hospital, Fairfield

The main hospitals located outside of Sydney and in rural New South Wales and Victoria which are used for clinical teaching are:

  • Wagga Wagga Base Hospital, Wagga Wagga
  • Albury Base Hospital, Albury
  • Wodonga Regional Health Service, Wodonga (Victoria)
  • Port Macquarie Base Hospital, Port Macquarie
  • Coffs Harbour Hospital, Coffs Harbour

It is expected that students who gain entry via the Rural Student Entry Scheme will be allocated to a rural hospital and undertake at least one of their final three years in a Rural Clinical School. Other local students may have the option or be required to also undertake at least 12 months of studies in rural hospitals. All students should expect at least 8 weeks in a rural rotation.

Students who are allocated to a rural hospital currently have as their home hospital Wagga Wagga, Albury, Coffs Harbour or Port Macquarie. Such students are also required to undertake some terms or part of terms in hospitals or health care facilities other than their home hospital.